Evergreen Public School District

OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments
(Formerly called Social Studies Classroom-Based Assessments or CBA's)

What are the OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments?

Why is Washington using the OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments to provide accountability for social studies?

What is the requirement related to the OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments in the Evergreen Public Schools?

What resources and support are available to teachers in the Evergreen Public Schools to help implement the OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments?

1. What are the OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments?

  • In short, the Social Studies assesments are multi-stepped tasks or projects aligned to specific state standards (Social Studies EALRs), which target skills and knowledge necessary for engaged, informed citizenship.
  • Completing an OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessment at a proficient level requires students to demonstrate that they have met particular Social Studies EALRs (typically 3-4 per CBA) by applying their understanding of social studies knowledge, concepts, and skills to a specific context that is meant to be relevant to the civic lives of these students.
  • OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments are designed to ensure that students employ critical thinking skills and engage in their own individual analysis of a particular context or topic.
  • There are 9 OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments targeted for elementary school, 10 for middle school, and 10 for high school. Each assessment focuses on one or more of the Social Studies EALR categories: civics, history, geography, and economics. Most assessments evaluate particular Social Studies Skills EALRs.
  • Nearly all of the assessments ask students to develop a position on an issue, event, or question, include background on the issue, event, or question, provide reasons and evidence for the position, and cite sources used to develop and support the position.
  • The key component of any OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessment is the rubric page which spells out how a student can reach proficiency for the particular assessment. In addition, each assessment also includes several components that are considered "support materials" for teachers and students, including the student checklist, a graphic organizer, and suggested resources. These supplemental materials are primarily designed to help students break down the overall assignment as well as provide scaffolding for the work they will need to do to complete the assessment.
  • OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments were designed primarily by teachers who tried to capture best practices so that these assessments would be able to fit into teachers' existing units.
  • OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments can be used at any time of the year although they are typically used as a culminating or summative assessment of learning that has occurred during a particular unit.

2.  Why is Washington using the OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments to provide accountability for social studies?

  • Validity: Given the broad, conceptual nature of our Social Studies EALRs, the OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments are a valid way to assess the learning of these standards and to help students gain the knowledge and skills authentic to engaged, informed citizenship. A more standardized form of assessing social studies learning (e.g., multiple-choice and short answer questions) would not have the same validity.
  • Coherence: District social studies programs will have greater coherence if OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments are included in each of their history, civics, geography, and economics courses from grades 3 through 12. The common rubrics ensure that students will be asked to meet similarly rigorous expectations as they move from grade to grade, as well as from district to district.
  • Balance: The OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments are designed to ensure accountability to the state’s standards while still maintaining a local district’s control over specific content in social studies.
  • Research: There is a great deal of research that indicates that having students engage regularly in rigorous, authentic, performance-based assessments, such as the OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments, increases their academic achievement in social studies and overall. The research by Cathy Taylor on classroom-based assessments has informed the development of the OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments as has the research of Fred Newmann and his associates on authentic intellectual work.
  • Integration: The Social Studies OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments are another way teachers can target important reading and writing standards in their instruction.
  • Accountability: The OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments and the reporting on the use of these assessments are one way the state is asking districts to ensure that all students have opportunities to meet the standards in civics, economics, geography, history, and the social studies skills.

3. What is the requirement related to the OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments in the Evergreen Public Schools?

Teachers of social studies in grades 3-12 must implement one OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments during the school year as assigned to each grade-level as indicated below. 

Grade

Content Focus

Required OSPI Assessment

Overview of Assessment Task

3

World Cultures

Cultural Contributions

In writing, students will:

·    Explain contributions made by two cultural groups

·    Compare and contrast the contributions made by two cultural groups.

·    List the title and author of sources used.

4

Washington State History:

Pre-History to 1889

People on the Move

In writing, students will:

·    Explain the reasons a group of people chose to migrate.

·    Explain the costs and benefits related to the move.

·    Describe the route taken by the group.

In a map, students will identify:

·    The starting location of the group.

·    The destination of the group.

·    The route taken by the group.

·    The geographic features that affected their route.

5

United States History:

1492 to 1791

You Decide

In writing, students will:

·    State a position on a public issue.

·    Provide background on the issue by explaining two stakeholders’ positions on this issue.

·    Include an explanation of how a right and the common good relate to the position on the issue.

·    List two sources including the title, author, type of source, and date of each source.

6

Ancient World History:
Pre-History to 1600

Enduring Cultures

In writing, students will:

·    State a position on how two different groups’ responses to a comparable challenge was similar or different.

·    Explain how the two cultures responded to the challenge.

·    Compare how two cultures responded to a challenge.

·    Provide reasons for the position supported by evidence.

·    Make references to sources of information.

·    Make a general statement of how these groups’ experiences helps us understand a current issue.

7

Washington State History

1850-present

World Geography

Causes of Conflict

In writing, students will:

·    State a position on the main causes of a conflict.

·    Provide background information related to the conflict.

·    Explain factors that helped cause the conflict.

·    Explains why one factor was most important in causing the conflict.

·    Make references to sources of information.

8

United States History:

1776-1877

Constitutional Issues

In writing, students will:

·    State a position on an issue that considers individual rights and the common good.

·    Provide reasons for the position supported by evidence.

·    Provide background on the issue.

·    Make a connection between the issue and a constitutional principle.

·    Make references to credible sources that provide relevant information.

·    Explain which Constitutional Principles and Democratic Ideals are addressed within this issue.

10

Modern World History: 1450-present

Dig Deep

In writing, students will:

·    State a position on an historical question.

·    Provide evidence for your position using two or more of the following social science perspectives: geographic, cultural, political, economic, sociological, psychological.

·   Provide reasons for your position that include an evaluation of how of three or more sources, including primary AND secondary sources, support the position on the historical question.

·   Make explicit references within the paper or presentation to three or more credible sources that provide relevant information AND cite sources within the paper, presentation, or bibliography.

11

United States History:

1890-present

 

Constitutional Issues

 

In writing, students will:

·    State a position on an issue that considers the interaction between individual rights and the common good AND includes an analysis of how to advocate for the position.

·    Provide reason(s) for the position that include:

·    An analysis of how the Constitution promotes one ideal or principle connected to the position on the issue.

·    An evaluation of how well the Constitution was upheld by a court case OR a government policy related to the position on the issue.

·    A fair interpretation of a position on the issue that contrasts with your own.

·    Make explicit references within the paper or presentation to three or more credible sources that provide relevant information AND cite sources within the paper, presentation, or bibliography.

12

Contemporary World Issues

 

US Foreign Policy

In writing, students will:

·    Analyze the reasoning behind a foreign policy

·    Explain costs and/or benefits of the policy to the United States and other nations

·    Develop a supported position on the overall effectiveness of the policy

·    Cite credible sources that provide relevant information.

4. What resources and support are available to teachers in the Evergreen Public Schools to help implement the OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments?

  • The Evergreen Public Schools have developed implementation plan packets for each grade level 3-12 which include unit plans, graphic organizers, and primary and/or secondary information sources. Teachers may use these implementation plans as is or customize the as they see fit.
  • The Social Studies Manager is available to consult with individual teachers and grade-level teams regarding the implementation of the OSPI-Developed Social Studies Assessments in the Evergreen Public Schools.
  • Contact Information:
    Social Studies Manager Ryan Theodoriches
    ryan.theodoriches@evergreenps.org
    (360) 604-4089